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Brown v. Board longline streetwear tee back Brown v. Board longline streetwear tee left side profile Brown v. Board longline streetwear tee men's fit Brown v. Board longline streetwear tee front Brown v. Board longline streetwear tee right side profile Brown v. Board longline streetwear tee women's fit front Brown v. Board longline streetwear tee women's fit back
Brown v. Board longline streetwear tee back
Brown v. Board longline streetwear tee back Brown v. Board longline streetwear tee left side profile Brown v. Board longline streetwear tee men's fit Brown v. Board longline streetwear tee front Brown v. Board longline streetwear tee right side profile Brown v. Board longline streetwear tee women's fit front Brown v. Board longline streetwear tee women's fit back
Brown v. Board longline streetwear tee back Brown v. Board longline streetwear tee left side profile Brown v. Board longline streetwear tee men's fit Brown v. Board longline streetwear tee front Brown v. Board longline streetwear tee right side profile Brown v. Board longline streetwear tee women's fit front Brown v. Board longline streetwear tee women's fit back

Brown V. Board

$55.00

This design shows a timeline of resegregation in US public schools. The two-digit numbers show percent minority students attending majority-white schools, with highlighted years of significant Supreme Court cases in Education.

10% of profits from this item go to support Youth Radio.

Details

  • Muhamad is 6'0", wearing size L
  • Kelly is 5'11", wearing size M
  • 90/ 10 cotton modal blend for luxury, soft touch and finish
  • Made in Los Angeles, USA
  • Standard relaxed fit
  • Questions about sizing? Email fox@originofmind.clothing

Description

This collection is designed to highlight realities in educational equity and (in)equality in the US. Our designs explore the differences in how this country invests in education across demographic groups. 

Design

America is a multicultural, diverse place. But it’s classrooms don’t always reflect that. Since 1988, schools have become more and more segregated. Today, less than 1 in 5 Black students attend schools that are majority-white.
What does resegregation mean in the context of public policy decisions? Why are today's students increasingly separated by race and class?

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